Brandeis Labor Coalition Proposes Just Employment Policy

Brandeis Labor Coalition Proposes Just Employment Policy

Students from the Brandeis Labor Coalition are leading the way to implement the Just Employment Policy at their university. Brandeis students and BLC members Julia Dougherty, Tamar Lyssy, and Andrew Nguyen wrote in the Brandeis Justice: Brandeis University is not immune to labor concerns. During the past few years, unjust labor conditions and practices have led us astray from our roots in cultivating social justice in our own community. … Workers employed directly by Brandeis receive a living wage, calculated as being $15.05 for a single adult in Waltham by the Crittenton Women’s Union. This does not extend, however, to workers employed by outside contractors. They continued: Brandeis Labor Coalition therefore is pushing for the implementation of a Brandeis Just Employment Policy for all workers, including those employed by outside contractors. This Just Employment Policy will provide an indexed living wage standard, ensure all workers have harassment-free work environments and ensure there exists effective, safe grievance procedures. The University will respect the right of workers to vote in union elections and uphold union agreements. Secure, full-time employment will be prioritized over temporary jobs. Lastly, oversight infrastructure will be created to enforce the Just Employment Policy and publish an annual report on labor conditions at Brandeis. Georgetown University’s Just Employment Policy, which has served as a model for our policy, guarantees a living wage, annually indexed to keep up with the costs of good and services in the area, to both University employees and full-time contract workers on-campus. Implemented in 2005, the policy also includes measures that ensure all workers have secure and just employment. Administration at Georgetown, at first hostile to the policy, now frequently...
In the News: Students Fight for a Living Wage for JCU Employees

In the News: Students Fight for a Living Wage for JCU Employees

The Carroll News wrote about students’ efforts to enact Just Employment Policy at John Carroll University in their February 12 article, “Students fight for a living wage for JCU employees.” Students are seeking to hold John Carroll University to its Jesuit values in regard to fair wages and treatment for all its employees. The recently initiated Jesuit Just Employment movement is led by seniors Devan Gisoni and Leo Orlando, both of whom were inspired by similar movements at other Jesuit universities. The movement aims to instate a Jesuit Just Employment Policy at JCU that requires the University to pay its employees a living wage and ensure fair treatment. Twenty-one out of the 28 Jesuit universities in the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities have just employment policies, and JCU is one of the seven that doesn’t. Read more at the Carroll...
Just Employment and Investment Policies: An Idea Whose Time Has Come

Just Employment and Investment Policies: An Idea Whose Time Has Come

Josh Daly, the interim director of the Center for Community Engagement at Loyola University in New Orleans, makes the case for Catholic and Jesuit campuses to adopt the Just Employment Policy in an article published in Conversations on Jesuit Higher Education. In his essay entitled, “Just Employment and Investment Policies: An Idea Whose Time Has Come,” he asks, “Have our Jesuit campuses fully lived out their ideals when it comes to the rights of campus workers and the investment of university endowments?” Daly argues that the Just Employment Policy presents an opportunity—if not an imperative—for Jesuit colleges and universities to use their power as anchor institutions in their communities to build more just social structures: We have an opportunity–at the invitation of our current Jesuit superior Fr. Adolfo Nicolás–to creatively reimagine the founding of our Jesuit universities and how we can embody our values in present realities. On business practices, two emerging networks of faculty, staff, and students are engaging in this creative process: the Jesuit Just Employment Project and the Jesuit Endowment Ethics Network (full disclosure: I belong to both). Both groups have been gathering stories of promising practices like those mentioned above and have been developing model policies and tools. I urge my colleagues across the family of Jesuit institutions to find out more and to join in this important work to raise our practices to the level of our ideals. Read more at Conversations on Jesuit Higher...